Pelasgians & Garamantes: The Blacks Of Ancient Greece

Pelasgians & Garamantes: The Blacks Of Ancient Greece

Pelasgians & Garamantes: The Blacks Of Ancient Greece

The Pelasgians and the Garamantes were two Black African Civilizations that first occupied and thrived in Ancient Greece before the Dorians and they are frequently shown depicted on Ancient Greek Art.

The Pelasgians – who were they?

The Pelasgians were a people who lived in Greece before the arrival of the Greeks. They were thought to be related to the Etruscans and other ancient peoples of Italy. The Pelasgians were dark-skinned and had curly hair. They were also tall and strong. The Pelasgians were skilled warriors and sailors. They built great ships and sailed to other lands. The Pelasgians were also artists and craftspersons. They made beautiful pottery, jewelry, and sculptures.

The Pelasgians lived in small villages. Each village had its own king or queen. The Pelasgians had their own language and religion. They worshipped many gods and goddesses, including Zeus, Poseidon, Athena, Apollo, Hera, Demeter, and Aphrodite.

The Greeks began to settle in Greece about 2000 BC. At first, they got along with the Pelasgians. But later, the Greeks started to oppress the Pelasgians. The Greeks took away their land and made them slaves. Over time, the Pelasgian culture was destroyed by the Greeks.

The Garamantes – who were they?

The Garamantes were an ancient Libyan tribe who inhabited the Fezzan region in the Sahara Desert. They were known to be a nomadic people who relied on their camels for transportation. The Garamantes were also known for their skill in irrigation and agriculture, as well as their horse and chariot-racing prowess.

In terms of history, not much is known about the Garamantes. They first appear in the historical record in the 3rd century BCE, when they came into conflict with the Roman Republic. TheGaramantes War (c. 23–19 BCE) was fought between the Garamantes and Rome, with Rome eventually emerging victorious.

Despite their defeat, the Garamantes continued to be a thorn in Rome’s side, raiding Roman settlements and caravans in the Sahara. In 19 CE, Emperor Tiberius launched a full-scale invasion of Garamancium (the capital of the Garamantes), which finally brought an end to their raids.

After that, very little is heard of the Garamantes until they vanish from history altogether sometime around the 5th century CE.

The connection between the Pelasgians and the Garamantes

The connection between the Pelasgians and the Garamantes has been a subject of debate for many years. Some scholars believe that the two groups were related, while others believe that they were not.

The Pelasgians were a group of people who lived in Greece in the Bronze Age. They were known for their maritime skills and for their construction of fortifications. The Garamantes were a group of people who lived in North Africa in the Roman period. They were known for their agriculture and for their fighting abilities.

Some scholars believe that the Pelasgians and the Garamantes were related because they both had dark skin. Other scholars believe that the two groups were not related because they had different cultures and spoke different languages.

It is still not clear whether or not the Pelasgians and the Garamantes were related. However, it is clear that they both had dark skin and that they both lived in areas where there was little sunlight.

Conclusion

In conclusion, the Pelasgians and Garamantes are two ancient Black African civilizations that played an important role in Greek culture. Through their legacy of innovation, artistry and strength they have left a lasting impact on our understanding of history.

Despite being largely forgotten by many modern scholars, these people remain an important part of Greek history that deserves recognition and study. We owe it to ourselves to remember them for the incredible contributions they made to our shared past.

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