Ethiopian Nagari Script Origins Of Sanskrit

Ethiopian Naga Origins Of Sanskrit

Ethiopian Naga Origins Of Sanskrit

Linguist and Anthropologist Dr Clyde Winters contends that the origins of Sanskrit can be traced to the Ethiopian Nagari Nagari language script spoken by the Ethiopian Naga Rulers of Ancient India.

From this perspective, India’s Ethiopian Naga Rulers introduced a writing system in their own language known as Nagari which was later called Sanskrit script to Ancient India. 

Nagari or Sanskrit probably developed from the first writing created by the Naga of India called Sabaean.

The earliest inscriptions of Sabean script were found at Haoulti in Ethiopia and they are over 3 000 years old. 

Extensive Trade relations between the Ethiopians with other lands in the Ethiopian Empire of Punt suggest that the Ethiopian Nagas probably used Sabean script initially to keep proper Civilian records throughout the Ethiopian Empire.

Over time this Ethiopian administrative writing system was modified to form an alphabetic system.

The Ethiopian Naga origins of Sanskrit were also confirmed by Sir William Jones more than 100 years ago when he pointed out that Ancient Ethiopic and Sanskrit writing are one and the same.

William Jones further demonstrated the Ethiopian Naga origin of Sanskrit by showing that both Ethiopic and Indian writing systems were read from left to right and that the vowels in both languages were annexed to the consonants.

Conclusion

Currently, the 3 main theories on the origins of Sanskrit do not trace Sanskrit to the Ethiopian Naga of India.

Instead, these theories claim that: 

1) Sanskrit developed from a proto-language called Proto-Indo-European (PIE). PIE was the common ancestor of a number of languages spoken throughout Europe and Asia, including Sanskrit. This theory is supported by the fact that Sanskrit shares many similarities with other Indo-European languages, such as Latin and Greek.

2) The second theory proposes that Sanskrit developed from a local language spoken in India called Proto-Dravidian. This theory is based on the fact that Sanskrit shares many features with Dravidian languages, such as Tamil.

3) The third theory posits that Sanskrit was independently developed in India and is not related to any other language family. This theory is supported by the fact that Sanskrit has unique features that are not found in any other language.

However, the alternative theory that the origins of Sanskrit can be traced to the Ethiopian Nagari Nagari language script spoken by the Ethiopian Naga Rulers of Ancient India first postulated by Sir William Jones contends that Sanskrit has its origins in the Nagari Ethiopian script created by the Ethiopian Naga Rulers of India during the era of the Ethiopian Empire of Punt which stretched from Africa’s Blue Nile River into India from circa 900 BC.

Indeed, the name Nagari itself when used to denote Sanskrit betrays the Ethiopian origin of the Sanskrit language. 

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